80% of Scots think they could do more to be energy efficient and sustainable at home

Countryside presenter and former BBC Blue Peter Star Helen Skelton will today launch the 'Areas for a Beautiful Future' campaign, celebrating those communities across Great Britain creating a more sustainable future.

 

 

With public and political attention on climate change at an all-time high, the campaign recognises the families and communities who are taking simple, positive steps at home, that together will add up to create a cleaner, greener, smarter future for everyone. 
West Lothian tops the table of communities across the UK when it comes to sustainability, with residents recycling 61% of waste and 43% of households having a smart meter installed. These two simple actions are free for residents to implement, but are a huge benefit the environment.
 
 
Scotland
England
Wales
1
West Lothian
Cheshire West and Chester
Bridgend
2
Clackmannanshire
East Riding of Yorkshire
Merthyr Tydfil
3
Falkirk
Tewkesbury
Torfaen
4
Fife
Kingston upon Hull, City of
Newport
5
East Ayrshire
Tameside
Rhondda Cynon Taf
6
Midlothian
Wakefield
Blaenau Gwent
7
South Ayrshire
Daventry
Flintshire
8
North Ayrshire
East Devon
Vale of Glamorgan
9
East Lothian
Stafford
Neath Port Talbot
10
Inverclyde
Barnsley
Wrexham
 
Despite the fantastic work going on around the country, three quarters (75 per cent) of Brits still think they could do more to be more sustainable and energy efficient in the home, with a third (33 per cent) being worried about their children or grandchildren's futures.
 
The poll by Smart Energy GB of 2,000 Brits also revealed why we're not being more sustainable - a fifth (20 per cent) think it costs too much and almost a quarter (26 per cent) believe it's too much effort. Plus, one in 10 feel they won't make an impact as one individual.
 
The 'Areas for a Beautiful Future' campaign aims to challenge these beliefs, outlining the small, often cost-free steps, such as getting a smart meter, everyone can take towards a greener, cleaner, smarter Britain. Two fifths (39%) of those polled were not aware that filling up the fridge (even if it's with bottles of tap water) is more energy efficient - therefore being more sustainable - a simple, cost free step which can be taken in the home.
 
The research also revealed (UK wide stats)
  • Just under one quarter (23 per cent) admitted they are aware of the environmental benefits of taking shorter showers, but don't make the effort to do so
  • Almost half (49 per cent) buy bottles of water in plastic bottles, and similarly almost a half (46 per cent) still boil more water in the kettle than needed
  • Nearly a third (32 per cent) will leave lights on in empty rooms
  • Over a third (38 per cent) use the car instead of walking and/or taking public transport
  • 50 per cent of those polled admitted to leaving appliances on standby
  • Just 15 per cent encourage friends and family to be more sustainable on a regular basis, which is surprising when four in 10 (40 per cent) feel guilty when they know they could have done more to be more energy efficient
Presenter and environmentalist, Helen Skelton commented: "Small actions really do add up to make a difference. By recycling at home and getting a smart meter you're taking a small step towards a more sustainable future for everyone."